Clinical Pearls

  1. Is It Edema or Lymphedema?

    How do you determine if lymphedema is present in a patient who has a history of breast cancer or who has had a significant injury to the upper extremity with prolonged or uncharacteristic swelling? In recognition of October as breast cancer awareness month, we collaborated with Sarah B. Compton, MSRS-PT, CLT to better understand how to identify early-stage lymphedema and to learn some early treatment techniques to use perhaps as your patient awaits referral to a lymphedema specialist.

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  2. Using a Relative Motion Orthosis when Treating a Boutonniere Injury

    Using a Relative Motion Orthosis when Treating a Boutonniere Injury

    Commonly, individuals with sports related proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint injuries may seek care several weeks after injury or may even ignore the injury until the season is over. Because many athletes do not recognize the severity of a volar dislocation of the PIP joint, the injury often progresses to a boutonnière deformity prior to seeing a medical professional.

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  3. A Simplified Approach to Neuromuscular Reeducation After CMC Joint Arthroplasty

    A Simplified Approach to Neuromuscular Reeducation After CMC Joint Arthroplasty

    Neuromuscular reeducation to improve movement patterns, coordination, and kinesthetic sense requires focused active exercise. To be effective such exercises must be executed correctly and repeated long enough to create lasting change in the motor cortex. The longer the maladapted motor pattern has been established, the more time and repetition is required for long-lasting change.

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  4. Medial Elbow Pain Signals Need for Total Shoulder Rotation Evaluation

    Medial Elbow Pain Signals Need for Total Shoulder Rotation Evaluation

    With baseball season here, we thought an evaluation tip for baseball/softball players experiencing medial elbow pain might be useful. To better understand the relationship between the shoulder and elbow during the throwing motion we recommend the Clinician’s Guide to Analysis of the Pitching Motion.

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  5. Regaining Synergistic Wrist Extension after Ending CMMS Too Early

    Regaining Synergistic Wrist Extension after Ending CMMS Too Early

    Six weeks after carpal tunnel release to her non-dominant hand, Debbie, a 64 year-old active retiree, was seen in our clinic with a diagnosis of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).

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  6. Which Hook Exercise Most Effectively Decreases Finger Stiffness?

    Which Hook Exercise Most Effectively Decreases Finger Stiffness?

    Regaining full finger flexion is the intuitive goal of all patients with finger stiffness. If passive motion is limited, many endeavor to regain passive joint flexion and then work actively on composite finger flexion, often squeezing exercise putty at end range.

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  7. Hands Down: Scapholunate Instability Treatment

    Hands Down: Scapholunate Instability Treatment

    A 73-year-old man [H.W.] presented in our clinic after twisting his right dominant wrist as he caught himself while falling. Diagnosed with a probable scapholunate [SL] ligament tear, H.W. could not undergo further diagnostic testing or surgery because of comorbidities.

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  8. A Simple Home Program for an Uncomplicated Distal Radius Fracture

    A Simple Home Program for an Uncomplicated Distal Radius Fracture

    Distal radius fractures are a common diagnosis treated in our outpatient clinics. Both fractures treated with cast immobilization and those surgically managed undergo a similar progression of home exercises.

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  9. Cycling with Thumb CMC Joint Arthritis: Keep Moving Forward!

    Cycling with Thumb CMC Joint Arthritis: Keep Moving Forward!

    Cycling is considered a low impact exercise but individuals with thumb CMC joint arthritis may not be able to comfortably ride a bicycle because of thumb pain. Adaptations of the bicycle handlebars may allow an individual to return to cycling without thumb pain.

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  10. More Than Just A Side Effect: Identifying & Treating Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    More Than Just A Side Effect: Identifying & Treating Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy (CIPN) (1, 2) is caused by cancer medication/s that harm healthy cells, causing neuropathies. Especially vulnerable are the sensory fibers of longer nerves. With progress in cancer treatment, we are seeing an increased number of patients with CIPN in our clinic.

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BraceLab wants you to be satisfied with your purchase from us. All Push Braces and Push Sports Braces are guaranteed against any defect in materials or workmanship for 90 days from the date of purchase, unless altered or laundered incorrectly (see product insert for instructions).

Patient Exchanges & Returns

BraceLab offers free returns and exchanges to ensure that you get the correct size and fit.

For Fit or Sizing Exchanges or Returns:
  • To request an exchange or return due to improper fit, please call us at 888-235-8221 or email us at support@bracelab.com within 30 days of purchase to receive return instructions and an RMA authorization number. Exchanges and returns must be received by BraceLab within 15 business days of the RMA authorization number issuance. No exchanges or returns will be accepted without an RMA authorization number.
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Therapist / Clinic / Reseller Exchanges and Returns

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